LIONS (PANTHERA LEO) IN Uganda

Principle Threats

Bovine tuberculosis is known to occur in buffalo populations in Queen Elizabeth National Park, although had not, by the year 2000, been observed in lions (Siefert, 2000).  Conflicts with human communities are common and the poisoning of lions has been reported (Chardonnet, 2002).  Armed conflicts on borders with the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan are a threat, as is the movement of infected livestock from South Sudan into the Kidepo Valley National Park (Chardonnet, 2002).  Lion predation on livestock between 1990 and 2000 in the vicinity of Northern Queen Elizabeth National Park were estimated at US$6,400 (Bauer & de Iongh, 2001)

Serum samples from 14 lions (Panthera leo) from Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda, were collected during 1998 and 1999 to determine infectious disease exposure in this threatened population...Ten lions (71%) had antibodies against [feline immunodeficiency virus], 11 (79%) had antibodies against [canine distemper virus (CDV)], 11 (79%) had antibodies against feline calicivirus], nine (64%) had antibodies against [feline herpesvirus 1], and five (36%) had antibodies against [feline parvovirus]. Two of the 11 CDV-seropositive lions were subadults, indicating recent exposure of this population to CDV or a CDV-like virus...These results indicate that this endangered population has extensive exposure to common feline and canine viruses.”

Bauer H, de Iongh HH (2001) Status and Needs for Conservation of Lions in West and Central Africa: Proceedings Information Exchange Workshop, Limbe, Cameroon, June 2001 (pdf)

Chardonnet P (ed.) (2002) Conservation of the African Lion: Contribution to a Status Survey. International Foundation for the Conservation of Wildlife, France & Conservation Force, USA.

Dricuru M, Siefert L, Prager KC, Dubovi E, Sande R, Princee F, Friday T, Munson L (2006) A Serosurvey of Viral Infections in Lions (Panthera leo), from Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda.  Journal of Wildlife Diseases 42 (3):667-671 (pdf)

Siefert L (ed.) (2000) Uganda Large Predator & Scavenger Research & Management Project Training Workshop Report: Large Predators - Data, Protocols, Viability, 23 July- 2 August 2000, Mweya, Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda. LPP/WARM Dept., Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

Trade in Lions

Trophy hunting of lions is prohibited.

Number of wild source lions estimated in international trade, 1999-2008:             0
Average annual wild source trade as percent of population size*:                           0%
* Used average of Chardonnet (2002) and Bauer & van der Merwe (2004) studies

Place J, Flocken J, Travers W, Waterland S, Telecky T, Kennedy C, Goyenechea A (2011) Petition to list the African Lion (Panthera leo leo) as endangered pursuant to the US Endangered Species Act.  The International Fund for Animal Welfare, The Born Free Foundation, The Humane Society of the United States and Humane Society International, Defenders of Wildlife (pdf)

Lions in Culture

“A common consequence of the human occupation of lion habitat is the development of negative perceptions of lion presence in the mind of local communities. A demonstrative example is the case study in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda, where questioned local communities openly expressed their negative attitude towards lions (Dricuru, 2000), to the point that "…in Queen Elizabeth NP…we are more concerned about the poisoning of wild carnivores and scavengers (lions, hyenas, vultures, etc)…this is extremely destructive -ecologically and

economically" (Siefert, 2000).”  (In Chardonnet, 2002)

A study conducted in and around Queen Elizabeth National Park asked communities about the best way to deal with stray lions that come into villages (Dricuru, 2000).  From 156 reponses:

- 37% of the respondents advocated that stray lions should be killed;
- 35% said a fence should be erected around the National Park, and;
- 28% felt people should be taught how to avoid lions.

A study (Moghari, 2009) of communities’ attitudes toward human-lion conflict and lion conservation reported the following results:

- 71.5% believed that lions ought to be conserved;
- 97% indicated that lions should not be killed for healing or any traditional medicinal purpose;
- 18% were aware of the usage of lion parts for witchcraft and traditional medicine;
- 95% considered lions the most dangerous animal they knew

Chardonnet P (ed.) (2002) Conservation of the African Lion: Contribution to a Status Survey. International Foundation for the Conservation of Wildlife, France & Conservation Force, USA.

Dricuru M (2000) The lions of Queen Elisabeth National Park - Uganda. Their demographic and health status and relationships with people. African Lion News, v.2, 14-16.

Moghari NM (2009) A Survey of Queen Elizabeth National Park (QENP) Communities’ Attitudes Toward Human-Lion Conflict and Lion Conservation.  PhD dissertation, George Mason University (pdf)

Siefert L (ed.) (2000) Uganda Large Predator & Scavenger Research & Management Project Training Workshop Report: Large Predators - Data, Protocols, Viability, 23 July- 2 August 2000, Mweya, Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda. LPP/WARM Dept., Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda.

Governing Body

Uganda Wildlife Authority
Plot 7 Kira Road, Kamwokya.
P.O. BOX 3530, Kampala, Uganda.

Email: info@ugandawildlife.org
http://www.ugandawildlife.org/

Mission

“To conserve, economically develop and sustainably manage the wildlife and protected areas of Uganda in partnership with neighbouring communities and other stakeholders for the benefit of the people of Uganda and the global community.

Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) is a semi-autonomous government agency that conserves and manages Uganda’s wildlife for the people of Uganda and the whole world .This agency was established in 1996 after the merger of the Uganda National Parks and the Game Department. Its creation followed the enactment of the Uganda Wildlife Statute in 1996 by parliament, which became an Act in 2000 under cap 200.

UWA as by law is mandated to ensure sustainable management of wildlife resources and supervise wildlife activities in Uganda both within and outside the protected areas.

With 10 National Parks(NP) and 12 Wildlife Reserves under its jurisdifiction, UWA’s role in managing the country’s tourism industry and attracting investors to the sector has been a significant one and rightly so. It also manages five Community Wildlife Management Areas (CWMA) and 13 Wildlife Sanctuaries (WS).The challenges facing the management and conservation of wildlife and biodiversity in Uganda are very many and they include poaching, competition in the regional tourism market, human wildlife conflict brought about by population and changing land use habits of communities that co-exist with wildlife as well as wildlife crimes.

Stakeholders, partners and communities that live around these protected areas have been employed to help tackle some of these issues. The organization has also employed an approach of using strategies in its management policies to help in solving some of these challenges. “

Lions in the News

Miscellaneous

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