It's time to stop the killing
July 20 2014

A Field Manual for Anti-Poaching ActivitiesAfrica’s wildlife is under attack from poachers, and many species face imminent extinction if the killing continues at current rates. 

The campaign group Save the Elephants estimates that between 2010 and 2012, 33,000 elephants were slaughtered for their ivory each year.  Last year, 1,004 rhino were killed in South Africa alone.  In the Central African region the illegal bush-meat trade totals up to 3.4 million tonnes per year, with poachers targeting primates, antelope, carnivores, rodents and fish. 

Wildlife loss however is dwarfed by the illegal trade in flora.  Currently, up to 90% of wood and wild plant products are believed to come from illegal sources. 

With a projected human population increase in Africa of another 1.1 billion people by 2050, and increasing global demand for Africa’s wildlife products, continued poaching will lead to widespread extinction and large-scale deforestation, with impacts felt globally.

To address this complex issue, the African Lion & Environmental Research Trust (ALERT) and Chengeta Wildlife have published “A Field Manual for Anti-Poaching Activities”.   The first publication of its kind, the manual presents the most comprehensive and pragmatic doctrine ever devised to bring the practice of poaching under control.  Further, this doctrine utilises existing local resources and personnel with objective and low-cost solutions.

The doctrine has been developed by Rory Young of Bannon-Tighe Global Assessment Group –himself a professional tracker with 25 years’ experience, alongside a number of security professionals with experience in investigations, special operations, law enforcement, and S.W.A.T. training doctrines.  The combined experience of these contributors has created a doctrine capable of tackling poaching from every angle and at every step of the process.

David Youldon, Chief Operating Officer for the Zambian based ALERT says, “Right now, organizations often end up latching onto some expensive technology or super-warrior as the magic formula to tackling the issues of wildlife protection.  Generally, the feeling is that soldiers are the people for the job, and the troops are being sent in more and more.  There are also many programs where serving and former foreign military men train scouts according to established military doctrine.  This is just not the answer.  Most of these troops are sent out and cannot find the "enemy".  They patrol around and around without ever even seeing a poacher.  This is because poachers, although often skilled fighters, are not conducting a military campaign - and they are past masters at not being found.  Conventional military practices do not apply.  What is needed in this struggle is a comprehensive doctrine, developed specifically for the complex and organized crime that poaching is, and that addresses all the problems with objective and inexpensive solutions.”

Co-author Rory Young explained that through ALERT he intends to provide training free of charge to Africa’s anti-poaching units to increase their effectiveness.  The doctrine and training includes: pro-active and reactive investigation techniques to understand the movements, areas of operation and modus operandi of poachers; surveillance and tracking skills to locate the poachers - developed with many years’ experience and incorporating aspects of anthropology, podiatry and forensic science; apprehension techniques to ensure a safe and effective method to capture poachers; and most importantly, how to prevent poaching in the first place.  He says, “Training is conducted within local and international laws and adapted to local conditions and sensitivities.  Wherever possible local trainers are to be used, and, the training of local individuals able to provide future training, is always the primary goal.  What we need is for these improved techniques to spread like wild-fire.” 

Lisa Groeneweg of Chengeta Wildlife, who is overseeing fundraising to implement the training programmes, explains, “At the moment we have sufficient funding to continue offering training courses for the next few months, but we urgently need more donations to meet the huge demand from African governments and anti-poaching units for training, as well as sponsors of the manual so that we can provide all rangers and scouts working in anti-poaching in Africa with a copy”. 


To read a sample of the manual click here.

To purchase an electronic copy of the manual, and help fund the training of APUs in Africa visit http://goo.gl/d80Kwz

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor of the manual so that free copies can be provided to APUs in Africa, contact info@lionalert.org

If you would like to make a donation to support this cause you can do so here.


SECURING MALAWI’S NATURAL HERITAGE

The Southern African nation of Malawi has not escaped the scourge of poaching that is decimating wildlife populations across the continent.  In many of the nation’s protected areas some species have already gone extinct, with many more in peril.  The most recent estimates suggest that only around 30 lions remain in the country.

ALERT has offered assistance in the form of anti-poaching training to enhance the effectiveness of existing operations.  Agreement has been reached with the Department of National Parks & Wildlife to bring the heads of anti-poaching for all of Malawi’s national parks together to undertake an intensive training course starting this August that will include training in how to pass on their knowledge to their anti-poaching teams when they return to their own parks.  Training will be funded by Chengeta Wildlife.   

ALERT is extremely proud to work with the Malawi Department for National Parks & Wildlife to support wildlife protection in the country.


ESTABLISHING WILDLIFE PROTECTION IN GUINEA

There has been no formalised body of national park rangers in Guinea since 1966, a country that holds one of the last remaining lion populations in West Africa.  Scientists believe that only 250 adult lions remain in the whole of West Africa, with Guinea forming part of the Niokolo-Guinea lion area that includes parts of neighbouring Guinea-Bissau, Mali and Senegal.  A small sub population of perhaps only 5 – 8 individuals also survives in Guinea’s Upper Niger National Park. 

A 2-year pilot initiative to implement a wildlife protection program in the country has begun - funded by the European Union and implemented by the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) in partnership with the Republic of Guinea’s Ministry of the Environment, Water and Forests.  The aim is to support the Ministry in the creation and application of a new corps of rangers in three of Guinea’s protected areas: Upper Niger National Park, Ziama Massif Biosphere Reserve and Mount Nimba Strict Nature Reserve.  The project was also conceived with the aim of reintegrating ex-combatants, and in providing support to the regular army in the context of regional insecurity.  UNOPS are currently in the process of rehabilitating the operational bases of these three sites, and selecting and equipping 38 officers and 290 rangers.  If successful, activities may be extended to a total of 4000 rangers across the Guinea’s protected area network.

Basic training of the officers and rangers will commence in August. One major training area needed for the project’s success is training in anti-poaching techniques.  To that end UNOPS have reached agreement with ALERT to provide training throughout October and November 2014.  Training will be funded by Chengeta Wildlife.

ALERT looks forward to working with the Republic of Guinea and UNOPS in supporting wildlife protection in this region.

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